Upper Seletar Reservoir

I went to Upper Seletar Reservoir on a soundwalk, accompanied by Ton P and Chelle Kiwimi. Parts of the jungle that make up this reservoir are also used for army training, so we had to tread carefully to avoiding any flying bullets!

As we journeyed further along the coast line we encountered a great diversity of insects and birds. At certain points along the trail the balance between the sounds of nature became apparent.

Upon reaching the tip of the second finger, it seemed that the tantilizing vibrations of cicadas were dominant. There were several variations on their call – one of which was much lower in pitch than I’d ever heard previously. I stood very still as not to disturb them and recorded. Suddenly, two cicadas appeared one after the other, right next to me.

Though I couldn’t see them, their proximity was clear to the ear. After several minutes they ceased, one by one, and the other sounds within the area took over.

One thing became clear during this soundwalk, the frequent appearance of the army helicopters seemed monolithic and overpowering in contrast to the colourful subtlety of nature’s call.

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2 Responses to “Upper Seletar Reservoir”

  1. What a wonderful experience you had! – Your sound walk to upper Seletar Reservoir and its parts of the jungle. The description of your walk is so beautiful, vivid and thrill. I enjoyed it. The account about the cicadas, “Suddenly, two cicadas appeared one and after the other,” seems me that the cicadas came to great to you and wondered what you are doing here. Though the sound of the army helicopters is apparently more powerful than the nature’s call, but I believe the nature’s call is actually much powerful. Because any man made gadgets could be destroyed by the natural agencies.

    • I believe that nature is more powerful too. Experiencing it can create a kind of primordial resonance within our deeper selves, which differs from any experience crafted by human hands. Whilst being a threatening force towards nature, there’s a certain fragility within the technology that empowers human beings. To me the fragility lies in its power to change our environment. If this power is harnessed without striving to create a balance between nature and ourselves, we will perish as a species since we are, and have been dependant on nature resources since the very beginning – indeed it is where we came from.

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